About your Search

20121101
20121130
STATION
MSNBCW 27
MSNBC 26
FOXNEWS 16
CNN 13
CNNW 13
COM 5
CNBC 4
FBC 4
KGO (ABC) 4
WETA 4
CSPAN 3
KPIX (CBS) 3
KQED (PBS) 3
KRCB (PBS) 3
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 170
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 170 (some duplicates have been removed)
plan. >> excellence. >> well executed. >> i thank you. >> a lot of criticism of fema back in katrina. today we hear nothing but good about fema. >> i thank craig would lives and breathes this stuff. >>neil: not so fast because all in rescueville is not so great. a lot of the folks they represent would like to kick them in the ass. this is the reality. welcome, everyone, not so happy friday. mr. president, you may want to wait on the "heck of a job" thing because rescue efforts have become heck of a joke for folks in the northeast fuming. because the help isn't coming. in gas. no power. no food. they have had it. >> restaurants and boats and homes are looted. >> the coast guard has not been here to help. >> come here and walk into the streets here. the water is this high. you have to wear the waders. >>neil: that is just on staten island. homes are swamps. motorists are stuck if -- in gas lines, four hours or more if you can find a place to fill in. two-thirds of gas stations even now in new york and new jersey remain shut down. out of juice. out of gas. thousands are fuming, out of p
there is no drinking water. >> neil: you and i sxi can remember with katrina, big difference in variety of levels. it was the same immediate response that things were under control. the famous heck of a job brownie comment that prompted the initial view, things are under control and not so bad. then we started getting the images, we started seeing more and more. it was not under control. we're seeing the initial response on the part of president and governor christie and mayor bloomberg and governor of new jersey is still speaking to reporters in hoboken. residents who are affected in these areas, you are talking a good game but it ain't happening to me. that is when it turns the tide. what do you see happening now if this lingers much longer? >> reporter: first of all, thank you for covering this story. i have been watching other stations, they are not covering this station. a lot of americans saw the instant response, this was a storm that was dealt with and very professional and competent manner and fema and state. now, we are finding out thanks in large part that is not the case. i think a lo
. a housing cyclone that hollowed out more homes that hurricane katrina and sandy combined. the very definition of disaster needs broadening. we need to recapture the initial horror created by those single natural disaster and put it toward the relief of our on going national disasters. the energy gathered by gale force winds has the power to focus our public attention. superstorm sandy may help the electorate focus in the few days that remain in the 2012 presidential campaign. our vote on tuesday will be for a disaster manager and chief taking charge of a country in an economic state of emergency, building a society that leaves all of us more prepared for disaster. at my table is ari melber, msnbc contributor. norry tan dan, kate dawson and david rodi, a reuters columnist and contributor for the atlantic. thank you all for being here. >> i want to start with you. the article, the piece you wrote was about the inequalities that have been revealed in the con te context of sandy. >> i am one of the privileged new yorkers. there has always been divisions in the city but this storm broug
overseas and with hurricane katrina down in new orleans, and they say it does not look much different. walking around and having it be dead silent and hearing the hissing of natural gas coming out of the ground, we are still as of yesterday in search and rescue mode to be sure everyone is out of their house and safe before they allow people to come back. it is a very frustrating time. i can tell you what he was talking about on the earlier call, i had the opportunity last night to talk to some people in the shelters and they are amazed at the amount of people willing to help, total strangers. random citizens donating goods to try to help their fellow man. it is unfortunate it takes a tragic event like this to bring the best out of people. host: what is the best way the federal government can help your district? guest: first of all, the president has been doing everything he needed to do along with the governor in giving the governor of the tools that we need here in new jersey to get this process started. it is going to be a multi-year process to get us headed back in the right direct
repetitive. it dulls the ears. here he doesn't have to mention bush. it's in everyone's head. katrina is recalled with the im. talk about fema, people think about the bush legacy. and so, he doesn't have make those contrastic splits, never mind about mitt romney, that helps him because he's doing stuff and it's all out there without the effort. >> you get the unearned assist from michael brown coming out. >> we'll talk about brownie. >> you couldn't ask for that. you couldn't make that bet. >> but there's karen welcome. hi. >> welcome to the show. i want to say, it's not just the presidential thing. it's also -- there's incredibly moving -- let's not forget the human toll this storm's taken. >> absolutely. >> the images of the president consoling americans in the wake of this massive disaster are incredibly powerful images. and what you heard in the president, what you heard from the president on the stump just now was empathy, this sense that he is fighting for you, that you have a seat at the table, middle class, working class americans, that he is there for you. and that fundamenta
and disasters i'm absolutely confronted by these two americas, the katrina/fema reaction and the sandy/fema reaction and the reality is to argue there hasn't been a significant political response to the significance of fema by different governments and it's not split down party lines. it's simply not true. there was a really great article in "mother jones" that took you through -- >> the development of fema competence. >> right. and who had headed fema and the way that presidents had appointed those fema heads were directly related to how they perceived their significance. so, for example, george bush actually allocated michael brown who was the former -- i just had to read this out, because i was just blown away. michael brown who was the former commissioner of judges and stewards for the international arabian horse association, that's who headed fema. clinton was the first -- was the first president to allocate the fema head who actually had experience -- >> disaster. >> -- disaster management. it's not political. it's about poverty. it's about race. and when we think about disaster
up in flames and four other houses. >> we think back about katrina and what a big impact that was on our country, we rarely think about the wind and the rain that was the initial storm, we think of the aftermath. right now we're in the aftermath period in terms of sandy. tell me how you feel about that. and before we get to rebuilding, people taking care of continuing damage right now, how do you assess the coordination between the state, federal, and local municipalities? >> i think we're doing very well. i think the president's response has been terrific, really. it's been coordinated unlike some of what happened in katrina. and you heard governor christie, who is a republican with president obama working together, and that's how it's been from the president, to the governor, to the counties and the towns. one of the things that i did today was talk to fema about trying to get an office and staff person in various parts of the district today, and they're working on it, and with the money that comes to downs for recovery to rebuild board walks or municipal buildings, i t
franklin. after katrina, you were a native of new orleans, you were appointed the vice chairman of the louisiana recovery authority and the job was to handle funds that were being disbursed by the federal government. in watching the rebuilding of new orleans and this whole process, what do you think that you learned that applies to what's going on now in new york and new jersey? >> three things. first of all, leadership matters. if you look at what's happening in new york and new jersey now organization view great leaders, michael bloomberg, deputy mayor bob steele, governor cuomo, governor chris christie. the president, obama, has been very involved. when we went through katrina, we were all back down in new orleans, it wasn't that strong of leadership. ray nagin was the mayor, sometimes not to be found. so i saw the importance of people who take charge and say i'm going to run into this crisis and i'm going to help solve it. secondly, it reminded us that we're all in the same boat together. this election is somewhat about the age-old tension between, all right, we're all indiv
a comparison with hurricane katrina. i want to use it as an analogy. but the analogy here that might be helpful, we think back to katrina and what that meant to us as a nation. we very rarely think about the wind and the rain that was the initial storm. right now we are in the aftermath period of this superstorm, sandy. how do you feel in terms of dealing with the aftermath, describing those explosions, these ongoing worries. before we get to rebuilding, rescuing people, taking care of continuing damage right now. how would you assess the response and the coordination between the federal government, the state government, municipalities. how are we doing? >> i think we're doing very well. i mean, you heard the president, and i have to say that i think his response has been terrific, really. and it's been coordinated, unlike some of what happened in katrina. and you heard, you know, governor christie, who's a republican, with president obama, working together. and that's how it's been, from the president to the governor, all the way down to the county and the towns. so one of the things that i di
't know what he shot about. he hot his mouth about katrina and we have seen record low levels. andrew cuomo linked climate change to sandy yesterday. >> steve: a county plans to move forward with a gun tax. under the plan will be a $25 tax on the fire arms and a plan to tax bullets. but the board dropped that because it would be more than the costs of ammunition. >> giant tiger shark. maria, a black belt was swimming in maui. and the shark confronted her and she gave it a best punch in the nose. she got more than a hundred stitchos her hand and thigh. >> steve: that's what you are supposed to do. >> gretchen: a woman was told her bible shirt was offensive. they made her cover tup with a jacket. they say it violates election laws and the attorney said he wants an apology or there will be a lawsuit. >> steve: is the on the ballot there? >> that shirt is permissible. keep the shirt on. >> steve: 20 minutes before the top of the hour. navy seals outraged over what happened in benghazi posted this on facebook. but facebook took it down. doesn't that vialate people's use of free speech. the
all of this living through this for a second time is proof of how katrina changed the nation's psychology when it comes to storms. >> yes. >> how many lessons have been learned, dark days along the gulf coast in '05. see it playing out. closest thing to katrina since '05. you are seeing the country changed after the storm, even response on every level has changed as well. interesting to watch, yet again for sure. >> yeah. >> coming up next, images are almost too much for adults to comprehend. for children, the pictures from sandy could be downright heartbreaking and confusing. >> we'll show you what one familiar fuzzy face is doing to help them understand. ♪ we have all been assaulted by the sights and sound of hurricane sandy. they can be hard for an adult but overwhelming for a child. >> imagine what it is like for kids. gma anchor josh elliott has this story. >> reporter: we adults called it a super storm. amidst the ferocity of nature's wrath, it was just plain scary. how do you talk to kids about getting through the storm of the century. we got together with a panel of
. some people calling it their katrina in a very unhappy way, of course, in part because it's cold. it's a cold katrina. and people are without heat and electricity. seats very tough. how does it play politically? we'll know in retrospect, i think like everything else, in this race. it is not known at this point how it will play. you can argue that the president looked commanding and like a leader when he came up to new jersey. you could also argue that things are starting to look a little tough in some of the neighborhood neighborhoods in new york and jersey, and so that might work against him. it's hard to say, but one thing i think is probably clearly true and that is the fact of the storm took the subject matter of mitt romney's closing statements, the end of his campaign, his big arguments sort of snuffed that out a little bit for a few days. inevitably, as we all talked about the storm. we weren't talking about the economy. we weren't doing all of that stuff. so in some way, that may have hurt him. and yet, at the same time, that all that was happening, in westchester, ohio, he w
at home, new york governor andrew cuomo calls superstorm sandy more impactful than hurricane katrina. now both new york and new jersey are asking for a combined total of more than $71 billion in federal aid. in new york, the money would pay not only for cleanup and recovery, it would also be used to try and limit damage for future storms. new jersey which saw heavy damage to its transit system and shoreline suffered nearly $30 billion in losses. >>> meanwhile, new jersey governor christie has now filed papers seeking re-election. >>> and now for a look at your national weather, let's turn to nbc meteorologist bill karins. he's tracking that weather channel forecast. good morning to you, bill. >> sensitive topic when you start comparing storms to katrina and all these. >> it does. >> it's like any big event. >> absolutely. >> yeah, over 1,000 people died and monetarily there's issued. every storm is different as we learned with sandy and all the other big hurricanes that have hit this country. we're not dealing with anything too bad today. if you have travel plans on the east coast, pay at
their lives. >> you remember this back with katrina, the same thing happened where a lot of residents in new orleans had seen a lot of hurricanes before. and they heard this is going to be the storm of century, and nothing ever happened to their houses, and they ignored evacuation orders. you can't -- there's only so much preparation you can do. you can never create a risk-free society. you can't prepare for everything. you know, but one of the things that has to happen in these situations for things to work right is for the government has a part to play, but individuals have a part to play, too. you've got to be working together so when people -- some of these people, obviously, their pain is genuine and totally understandable. but some of these people did, you know, were told to leave and didn't leave. and you understand why they didn't. it makes sense in human terms, but, you know, there is a responsibility that you have for yourself in addition to what the government obviously has for you. and again, if both sides are woaren't working together, that's when things fall apart. >> the perso
of the group's system of levies that were installed in new orleans in the gulf coast after katrina. >> people asked about located -- katrina and the rebuilding. not smart to build on an ocean. will the flood-prone areas be redefined, and will reveal did occur outside areas? -- will the rebuilding occur outside those areas? guest: this will be a tricky question going forward. along the jersey shore, and iconic part of their coast, a huge industry for them. they are saying it needs to be rebuilt. there are other places in new york city, mayor michael bloomberg is saying that we need to reevaluate places to rebuild and make sure we move around a little bit. especially with the storm coming at a time when state and local governments are so strapped for money. that is something that is being talked about, and i think there are certain places where you can see development has increased in recent years that may have made flooding worse. this is something you hear anecdotally of the ground. talk to people on staten island where there was very bad flooding. they say 40 years ago the neighborhood ports
a montage of people in the east coast. whole story has shifted into what i am calling obama's katrina. watch this. >> we keep convincing people. >> we -- what is going on here [bleep]. >> the old lady has nothing. >> what are we going to get. [bleep]. >> and i mean, seriously, people out here are very frustrated by what's going on. >> it's just chaos. it's pandemonium out here. >> everybody is hotheaded, everybody is upset. >> we can't live like this. it's too hard. we cannot live like this! people who have not even left their apartment because they scared. we can't live like rats. this is disgusting. >> we need to -- please, president obama, please listen to us down here! we are going to die! you don't understand. you've got to get your trucks here on this corner now! >> we need help. fema takes so long. three to five days, we have no place to go. >> my kids are in the shelter with me. >> this story has flipped. gas lines minimum four hours all across new york, new jersey and long island. the president comes in, photo op and leaves. >> the minute he got the photo op he went back to being ca
katrina are inspiring one high school to come to the aid of hurricane sandy victims. help is on the way, and that's the message sent by errol heights students and faculty. the group is on a mission to send this semi-trailer stocked withed food, blankets and other helpful items. well, i'm lynn berry. this is "early today," just your first stop of the day today on your nbc station. >>> well, a dangerous fire forced officials to evacuate an entire town. close to 1,000 people received orders to abandon their homes. a chemical fire erupted from this derailed train car and then began leaking dangerous fumes. the evacuation order is still in effect until that fire burns out. >>> all right. new images show one animal's odd connection to halloween. a massachusetts fisherman caught this female lobster last week. look there. see? scientists say the crustacean, she is half orange, she's half black. the crustacean's split coloring happens every 50 to 100 million lobsters. that orange and black is the most common color combination. interesting. >>> well, class was in session when a drunken intruder b
and then paid the price after katrina, and this president put it back up again and what not political people in, and it is paying off this week, it really is paying off. >> colby? >> it also draws a sharp contrast between the two candidates. here you have president obama citing fema as the vehicle to coordinate the federal effort, and you had mitt romney last year on the campaign saying he would get rid of fema, he would turn the responsibilities back to the states, showing no appreciation for the role that fema place. >> this is a nightmare for political candidate romney. >> it is, especially if you are going after swing votes, woman voters in ohio, the so-called waitress a vote. they want a president who will care for them and be a guardian. this is an ad for a president who worries about you. it is terrible for romney. it stopped his momentum. maybe the polls or all wrong and romney is going to win anyway, but if you looking at the polls right now, obama has got it. >> did ghani have momentum, was that republican --romney of momentum, or was that republican spin? >> he definitely add momentu
and paid a price after katrina, and this president built it back up again, put a professional in charge, but people who knew what to do, and it is paying off. >> colby? >> it also draws a sharp contrast between the candidates. you have president obama pushing the federal efforts and citing fema as his vehicle, and you had romney last year saying he would get rid of fema, saying that he would turn it back to the states and showing no appreciation of the role that fema plays i tragedy. >> this is a nightmare for romneycare he is in tough spot. -- a nightmare for romney. is in a tough spot. >> you are going for a woman voters, swing voters in ohio, the so-called waitress vote, this is an ad for a president who cares about you. it is terrible for romney. maybe the polls are wrong, but if you're looking at the polls right now, obama has got it. >> did romney have momentum or was that just republican spin? >> he did have momentum after the first debate -- >> we have had a three since then -- >> what obama was never able to recapture the lead. >> i cannot say with certainty that there was mome
-known liberal bias. first katrina tainted george bush's presidency. then isaac wiped out the first day of the republican national convention. now hurricane sandy. sandy, what kind of name is that? are you a dude storm or a lady storm? oh, big surprise, just when obama needs a boost, who shows up but a gender-ambiguous weather system, a category 5 by cure cane. (laughter) hey, hey, don't get me wrong, i don't mine you being a hemispheric scale meteorological event, but why must you be so flamboyant and in my face about it? (cheers and applause) no, i'm hurricane sandy, deal with me! now, make no mistake, folks, the hurricane agenda is to make the federal government look necessary! (laughter) well, mitt romney understands that disaster relief belongs only on the state level. as he explained when asked about his plans for fema during a primary debate. >> every time you have an occasion to take something from the federal government and send it back to the states, that's the right direction. and if you go even further and send it back to the private sector, that's even better. >> stephen: r
everything that everybody else did getting ready for it. i was -- i sat through katrina when katrina happened. so i have kind been through a little bit of this before. but this is -- what happened here the skop scope of it. i don't think we know the scope. >> the magnitude is greater than anyone has grasped yet. >> this is where we need our news media to come in. if i may we need fewer reporters standing in waist-high water seeing they are going to be blown over and more real reporting, real news. what's going on. >> i have heard that criticism. i don't agree and i will tell you why. when i see someone standing in atlantic city in the middle of a boardwalk actually in water and i agree with him. anyone man enough that thinks they should be going out for a stroll, walking a dog and looks at that and saysly stay in. >> i was looking ate and watching ali being blown around in new york city. my first thought was why is cnn trying to kill ali velshi? what did he do here? >> ali -- >> for the 2008 crash coverage. >> it is a dramatic image that fully tells the story of how big this is and how danger
dollars from katrina! >> cenk: from katrina! bitter man. i love how bitter they are. my favorite was brit hume. he said: >> cenk: you know why? because sandy was hitting washington, d.c. at that moment. it's not like the government wasn't responding. president obama was all over the place. they were totally at work, they just sent home people like they did in new york and other places because they were in the middle of the storm. oh where's the government now? what a bunch of losers on fox news! all right now i had given the president some advice on how to attack mitt romney. if you remember, this was part of the ad we said he should run. >> it's not that mitt romney doesn't care about running, it's just that he isn't on your team. >> corporations aren't people, my friends. >> under bush, stock prices went up while job in connection and wages for us went down. mitt romney, what's the difference between you and george w. bush. >> if you raise taxes on the so-called rich, you're really raising taxes on the job creators. >> stop this war on job creators. >> they're the same republicans with
call that had to be made in new orleans after katrina with mardi gras. >> huge debate. the difference was -- the storm in august. mardi gras was in february. months between. now days between. >> i know. >> i don't know. i don't know. a tough call here. it is going to go on. the mayor said it is. those of you coming into the city to do it. run hard. run well. we'll be back with more after this. >> announcer: this is abc's "world news now." informing insomniacs for two decades. >>> this morning on "world news now," a presidential promise of help in the heart of the hurricane devastation. >> president obama and new jersey governor chris christie stood side by side as they toured the destruction and talks with the victims of sandy. it's thursday, november 1st. >> announcer: from abc news, this is "world news now." >>> good thursday morning, i'm sunny hostin. paula faris is on assignment. >> always good to have you as the co-pilot here. >> so good to be here. >> there's power here and there's heat which is good. >> yes. both of which i do not have at home. >> soldiering through. welcome b
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 170 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)